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The Rubens House in a nutshell

“Welcome to my house!” Peter Paul Rubens, a brilliant and versatile artist, invites you to his palazzo.

 

The Rubens House is open. Tickets are to be purchased online for a visit during a fixed time block.
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The Rubens House in one minute

"Welcome to my house!" Peter Paul Rubens, brilliant and versatile artist, invites you to his palazetto in the centre of Antwerp. The master lived here with his family for years and painted with his colleagues and assistants in a studio that he designed himself. He created many of his paintings in this house. His work has inspired artists and art aficionados for over four hundred years. Here he received important patrons and cherished his unique art collection. This unique museum, the master's house, is the only place in the world where Rubens's presence is so tangible. And you are here as his guest. Welcome!

In the spotlight

Topstukken

Masterpieces

The permanent collection contains a large number of works by the master himself and by his peers and contemporaries. These are the masterpieces that you cannot afford to miss.

A new building for the Rubens House

The Rubens House, ready for the future

A master plan for the master

The Antwerp City Council took the decision, backed by a leverage grant from Tourism Flanders, to draw up a master plan for the Rubens House site. The plan aims to improve the infrastructure and give the Rubens House back the lively and inspiring atmosphere it had in the seventeenth century. It aims to do so with a vision worthy of Rubens, so that the site is firmly anchored in the twenty-first century and ready to face the future.

An interview with architect Paul Robbrecht

Robbrecht and Daem architects

We spoke with Paul Robbrecht from Robbrecht and Daem architects about his fascination for Rubens and how he was inspired by the master in the concept for the new reception building.

About the restoration of portico and garden pavilion

Online talk with Ben van Beneden

"No botox, no fillers, no repairs, no false nose, no false ears. No, keep the original material as much as possible." This is how director Ben van Beneden describes the essence of the restoration of the portico and garden pavilion. In 15 minutes he takes you on a journey of 400 years through time. His story starts with the restoration of the Rubens House in 1939 and makes a few detours to the 17th century.

360° photography reveals secrets of restored portico and garden pavilion

Why did Rubens incorporate an ox skull in the portal? What is the meaning of the Latin proverbs above the portico entrances? Why did Rubens place a statue of Hercules in his garden pavilion? A unique online tour featuring 360° photography uncovers the portico and pavilion’s secrets and brings to life some rare traces of Rubens the architect.

Rubens House wins Europa Nostra Award

The 2020 European Heritage Awards/Europa Nostra Awards saw the Rubens House honoured with one of the world’s most renowned heritage prizes for the restoration of its portico and garden pavilion.

Restoration of portico and garden pavilion completed

The imposing portico and garden pavilion at the Rubens House can now be viewed again by the public. After a year and a half, their restoration is complete. Rubens designed both features himself, making them rare evidence of Rubens as an architect.

About Rubens

Rubens

He was capable of everything and knew everything. He was a brilliant and versatile artist, run a large studio, spoke several languages, collected art, designed his own home, travelled around Europe as a diplomat and was interested in science. Rubens was well-versed in almost everything.

Rubens in Antwerp

Peter Paul Rubens and Antwerp. The master and his city. After more than 400 years, this world-class painter's presence can still be felt in the city.